Squaring the Circle Crochet Pattern Tutorial

Hi folks 🙂

I love squaring the circle – turning crochet circles into squares.  It’s always so much fun.

squaring the circle

I’ve written up a few slightly different patterns over the past few years – in my More Than a Granny ebook, my Dotty Spotty Baby Blanket, my Block Bag & for my Beyond the Granny CAL.

Squaring the circle

Different sizes circles squared for my Dotty Spotty Baby Blanket

I find myself going back to it over and over so I thought a stand alone tutorial post was in order. It works best in 2 colours I think, but you can do as many as you like of course.

If you want to download a PDF of the pattern, you’can download it in your preferred terms by clicking the one you want below :

US Terms   UK Terms

Squaring the Circle Tutorial

You’ll find the UK terms above the pictures and US terms under the pictures.

You will need 7 metres (7.7 yards) for the circle and 10 metres (11 yards) for the squaring off.

Abbreviations

If any stitches are new to you, check our my YouTube videos showing how they’re done.

UK  Terms                                  US Terms

sp/s = space/s                                                 sp/s = space/s
ch = chain                                                        ch = chain
st ch = starting chain                                     st ch = starting chain
ss = slip stitch                                                 ss = slip stitch
dc = double crochet                                      sc = single crochet
htr = half treble crochet                               hdc = half double crochet
tr = treble crochet                                         dc = double crochet

Using circle colour, begin with a magic circle.  Alternatively, ch 4, then join your last ch to the first with a ss, forming a loop.

Round 1

UK : ch 3 (st ch), 11 tr, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch.
{12 sts}

Squaring the circle

US : ch 3 (st ch), 11 dc, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch.
{12 sts}

Round 2

UK : ch 3 (st ch), tr in same sp as ss, 2 tr in next 11 sts, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch.
{24 sts}

Squaring the circle

US : ch 3 (st ch), dc in same sp as ss, 2 dc in next 11 sts, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch.
{24 sts}

Round 3

UK : ch 3, tr in same sp as ss, *tr in next st, 2 tr in next st*, repeat from * to * 10 times, tr in next st, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch. Fasten off yarn and weave in centre end. You can crochet over the end tail.
{36 sts}

Squaring the circle

US : ch 3, dc in same sp as ss, *dc in next st, 2 dc in next st*, repeat from * to * 10 times, dc in next st, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch.  Fasten off yarn and weave in centre end. You can crochet over the end tail.
{36 sts}

Round 4

UK :  Attach new colour to any st with a standing tr, tr in same sp, *tr in next st, htr in next 2 sts, dc in next 2 sts, htr in next 2 sts, tr in next st**, (2 tr, ch 2, 2 tr) in next st*, repeat from * to * twice and from * to ** once, 2 tr in same sp as first sts, ch 1, join with dc to 3rd ch of st ch.
{12 sts along each side and 4 x 2 ch corner sps}

Squaring the circle

US :  Attach new colour to any st with a standing dc, dc in same sp, *dc in next st, hdc in next 2 sts, sc in next 2 sts, hdc in next 2 sts, dc in next st**, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in next st*, repeat from * to * twice and from * to ** once, 2 dc in same sp as first sts, ch 1, join with sc to 3rd ch of st ch.
{12 sts along each side and 4 x 2 ch corner sps}

Round 5

UK : ch 3 (st ch), *tr in next 12 sts**, (tr, ch 2, tr) in 2 ch sp*, repeat from * to * twice and from * to ** once, tr in same sp as first st, ch 2, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch.  Fasten off yarn and weave in ends.
{14 sts along each side and 4 x 2 ch corner sps}

Squaring the circle

US : ch 3 (st ch), *dc in next 12 sts**, (dc, ch 2, dc) in 2 ch sp*, repeat from * to * twice and from * to ** once, dc in same sp as first st, ch 2, join with ss to 3rd ch of st ch.  Fasten off yarn and weave in ends.
{14 sts along each side and 4 x 2 ch corner sps}

NOTE : while I use a ‘starting chain’ in the written pattern, in reality I use a ‘false st’ instead.  It give you a more seamless look. Here’s my YouTube video showing how it’s done :

That’s it!  You can use any hook and yarn.  I’ve used 8 ply cotton yarn and a 5 mm hook for the tutorial pics above but the recommended hook size for this yarn is 4mm.  Below you’ll see it in thin t-shirt yarn where I used a 8mm hook next to my 8 ply cotton.  As long as it’s sitting flat as you go, all will be well no matter what you use.

squaring the circle

I like to join my squares by holding them right sides together and dc (UK) / sc (US) through both loops of both blocks.  You can see how on my YouTube channel or in this post.

squaring the circle

A word about yarn

I love to use cotton yarn for it’s lovely feel and look – how’s that stitch definition?  I used Bendigo Woollen Mills yarn for the samples above which is easily available here in Australia, but if you live elsewhere, you can find many cotton yarns online in places like Wool Warehouse, Love Knitting and Deramores.

Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links.  If you make a purchase after clicking the link, I may receive a small commission that will help me continue to design and provide new patterns for you. 

35 thoughts on “Squaring the Circle Crochet Pattern Tutorial

  1. Maria

    Thank you so much for this tutorial. I think you were reading my mind. ???? It’s also nice to know that someone, other than me, needs to use larger hook sizes than recommended ????. I’m positive I’m not a tight crocheter and relaxed ????

    Reply
  2. Brad

    This tutorial really helped. For mine, I used a 3.5mm hook and some DK Yarn (Dark Blue and Red) and it is the perfect size to make coasters, which is what I have used them for. I am making a blanket at the moment and I may use them as a border to the giant Granny Square that the blanket is made out of.

    Reply
  3. Pingback: A new blanket… | Simply happIness

  4. Renn

    Thank you so much for the chainless start explanation! I have been trying to figure out how everyone’s work always look so neat and uniformed and mine looked like I was crocheting with all thumbs!
    I just tried another square using this method and it looks much better!!

    Reply
  5. Debbie

    Please if u can try to answer me, I am very new at this and I need help. Do u ever do video tutorials?
    How many colors did u choose look liked 7 colors. IDE like to make a full size so my husband can wrap up when it’s cold , how many would I need, thank you for taking time to share your items thank u

    Reply
    1. Shelley Husband Post author

      Hi Debbie 🙂

      I do have a YouTube Channel that mainly shows individual stitches and techniques. You can find that here.

      As for your other questions, well that’s a bit more complicated – how long is a piece of string? There are so many variables. The way I’d approach it is to make one of the squares in the yarn you’d like to use and then do some maths. Figure out how big you want the blanket to be, then measure your square and see how many you’d need. Then you need to figure out how much yarn each square used. The most accurate way to do it is to unravel a made square and measure the length of yarn used. You could also weigh the square and work it out that way, but it’s not as accurate.

      I hope that’s of some help 🙂

      Reply
      1. Ricki

        Probably would be helpful if i explained what I’m doing…. I have these big circles that I made… the last row is 88 stitches around. I want to square around them, make panels, then join several panels together to make a blanket. I’ve not done ANY squaring circles before… Could you tell me how you’d square off the first quarter of the circle… then I can take it from there… so what would stitches 1-22 be to start squaring off such a big circle? Does that make more sense… lol 😉

        Reply
        1. Shelley Husband Post author

          Ah I see 🙂 There are endless ways to do it but this is the simplest.

          Ok so you start with some maths. 88 – 4 = 84. I take 4 off as 4 stitches will count as the corners. So then 84/4 = 21.

          So there will be 21 sts along each side. Next you break it up into groups of 4 & 1 lot of 5 and allocate stitches to each group. The 5 will be the middle of the side with 2 groups of 4 sts either side. So you’d do dc/sc (UK/US) in the 5, htr/hdc in the 4 sts either side of the 5 sts, tr/dc in the first and last 4 sts of the side.

          Then you decide on the corner. I’d to (hdtr, dtr, ch 2, dtr, hdtr) in each corner st (UK) In US that’d be (htr, tr, ch 2, tr, htr).

          It may not be exactly square, but will be a good starting point to work on. You may need to experiment a bit to get it really square. Hope that helps!

          Reply
  6. Szilvia

    Dear Shelley,
    thank you, thank you, thank you sooo much for the chainless start!
    I have been struggling with those chains for ages, never could get them right, and you have just saved me from all that.
    You are a truly wonderful person ?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Shelley Husband Post author

      Oh it’s my pleasure Szilvia! I was so happy when I learned how to do it – it really does make a huge difference.:) You’ll love the look of your crochet so much more now 🙂

      Reply
  7. Leona

    Hiya and thank you so much for this Shelley as you explained it all so easy and i have not been crochet for long but i love this, and i sooooo look forward to you doing more of this to help people like me. You are the first person to which i can easily follow your instructions and i thank you again for that, Ps i have subscribed to your you tube channel also now 😀

    Reply
    1. Shelley Husband Post author

      Hi Melanie.

      I’m not really sure what you’re asking? The example here specifies the stitches for this size circle. Let me know more information about what you’re wanting to do and I’ll see if I can help.

      Reply
    2. Tracy

      Hi Melanie,

      I think you may be looking for the same information I was. See Shelley’s reply to Ricki above. She explains how to take an existing circle and calculate the stitches needed to make it square. Is that what you need? I hope this helps. Good luck.

      Shelley, thanks so much for the explanation, I’ve been trying to work this out all evening. I wish I had read your answer before making myself crazy! It did confirm I was on the right track. Thank you for taking the time.

      Reply
  8. Karine

    Thanks for the explanations. My circle has 48 stitches. I read your explanations above but I m lost. Help me please.
    Karine

    Reply
    1. Shelley Husband Post author

      Hi Karine 🙂

      Ok so you have 48 sts. So the first step is to take off 4 – one for each corner. So that leaves you with 44 sts. Divide that by 4 and you have 11 sts available for each side of squaring off.

      So there’s no hard and fast rule, and many ways to do it, but I’d have (tr, ch 2, tr) in each corner, then do these sts in the 11 of each side – tr, 3 htr, 3 dc, 3 htr, tr. Give that a go and see what it’s like. You may have to do (2 tr, ch 2, 2 tr) in each corner. It will depend on lots of things. Trial and error is the way to go. Good luck 🙂

      Reply
  9. Sarah

    Love this pattern but I am having trouble with round 3! I follow the instructions completely but repeating the pattern of 1 dc then 2 dc ten times only leaves me with half a round completed! What am I doing wrong?

    Thank you!

    Reply
  10. Gill Reay

    Seems like it should be simple arithmetic, but do you use the same amount of yarn whatever the weight of the yarn?
    Regards
    Gill

    Reply

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